Baroness {Tanka}

Beyond the ocean,
A glare stares back on my mind –
Rare like a ruby
On my old wooden table.
Nothing’s of more royal’ty


© by A. J. R. Hewitt
for more poets and creative writing visit thepoetsanctuary.net
 

© by A. J. R. Hewitt

© by A. J. R. Hewitt

© by A. J. R. Hewitt

© by A. J. R. Hewitt

Birds of time {a Dorsimbra}

Birds of time

Those fatal gestalts sitting on screaming shades,
They stretch their wings widely likewise dire blades
And cut through the blue, peaceful silence of day,
Of my innocence-woollen freedom’s ballet.

Who are they?
Birds of love? Birds of death?
But no! Between silences
They evince fluently both.

Oh, fleeting fledglings, how graceful your flight! 
They greet newborns with loving pinions; a flap
Eliminates! Beware of their sound, alas
Those fatal gestalts sitting on screaming shades!

© by A. J. R. Hewitt  
picture © “Cloudy Skys” by AmberDawnn

.
(yup, I know it’s a dirty Dorsimbra :P)

writing crash course: Dorsimbra

Stanza One: Four lines of Shakespearean sonnet (iambic pentameter rhymed abab). 
Stanza Two: Four lines of short and snappy free verse. 
Stanza Three: Four lines of iambic pentameter blank verse, where the last line repeats the first line of Stanza One. 

Try it out!

(wonder why it’s called Dorsimbra? This poetry form was created by Frieda Dorris, Robert Simonton and Eve Braden :)

© by John Chao

© by John Chao

A shot showing contoured hills with spring flowers at Painted Hills in John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon© by John Chaofound on National Geographic 

A shot showing contoured hills with spring flowers at Painted Hills in John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon
© by John Chao


found on National Geographic
 


Patterns in Nature: Trees
Ranks of aspen trees crowd a dense grove outside Aspen, Colorado.© by Taylor Kennedyfound on National Geographic

Patterns in Nature: Trees

Ranks of aspen trees crowd a dense grove outside Aspen, Colorado.
© by Taylor Kennedy


found on National Geographic

"And that desire—the strong desire to take pictures—is important. It borders on a need, based on a habit: the habit of seeing. Whether working or not, photographers are looking, seeing, and thinking about what they see, a habit that is both a pleasure and a problem, for we seldom capture in a single photograph the full expression of what we see and feel. It is the hope that we might express ourselves fully—and the evidence that other photographers have done so—that keep us taking pictures."


SAM ABELL



Crater Lake Clouds© by Sam Abell

found on National Geographic

Crater Lake Clouds
© by Sam Abell

found on National Geographic